ENGLISH HINDI
Q.1
Read the following passage and answer the questions given below it. It was in Gerrnany and France that the first successful attempts were made to produce an internal-combustion engine driven by petrol. In England, people were strangely timid about horseless vehicles. English inventors were handicapped by a quaint old law that forbade any such vehicle to attain a greater speed than four miles an hour, and compelled each one to be preceded by a man carrying a red flag. This law was not repealed until 1896. The earliest motorcars were looked upon as mere jokes, or as rather dangerous playthings, by everyone except their inventors. Some of them were single-seaters, others would carry two or even three people; but all were noisy, clumsy, queer-looking things. When in 1888, Carl Benz, a German, produced a three-wheeled, internal-combustion car, a great forward stride had been made. Another German, whose name, Daimler, is often seen on motor cars to this day, was experimenting about the same time, and testing a petrol-driven engine. It is easy to understand how the introduction of the petrol-driven engine revolutionised road transport throughout the world. Until then the necessary power to push a vehicle along could not be obtained without the cumbersome tanks, boilers and furnaces of the steam engine. The internal-combustion engine is light in weight and small in size by comparison; the fuel is burned in it, so that there is no waste, like the dusty cinders of a coal fire.
How did most people regard early motor cars?



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Q.2
Read the following passage and answer the questions given below it. It was in Gerrnany and France that the first successful attempts were made to produce an internal-combustion engine driven by petrol. In England, people were strangely timid about horseless vehicles. English inventors were handicapped by a quaint old law that forbade any such vehicle to attain a greater speed than four miles an hour, and compelled each one to be preceded by a man carrying a red flag. This law was not repealed until 1896. The earliest motorcars were looked upon as mere jokes, or as rather dangerous playthings, by everyone except their inventors. Some of them were single-seaters, others would carry two or even three people; but all were noisy, clumsy, queer-looking things. When in 1888, Carl Benz, a German, produced a three-wheeled, internal-combustion car, a great forward stride had been made. Another German, whose name, Daimler, is often seen on motor cars to this day, was experimenting about the same time, and testing a petrol-driven engine. It is easy to understand how the introduction of the petrol-driven engine revolutionised road transport throughout the world. Until then the necessary power to push a vehicle along could not be obtained without the cumbersome tanks, boilers and furnaces of the steam engine. The internal-combustion engine is light in weight and small in size by comparison; the fuel is burned in it, so that there is no waste, like the dusty cinders of a coal fire.
Q.3
Read the following passage and answer the questions given below it. It was in Gerrnany and France that the first successful attempts were made to produce an internal-combustion engine driven by petrol. In England, people were strangely timid about horseless vehicles. English inventors were handicapped by a quaint old law that forbade any such vehicle to attain a greater speed than four miles an hour, and compelled each one to be preceded by a man carrying a red flag. This law was not repealed until 1896. The earliest motorcars were looked upon as mere jokes, or as rather dangerous playthings, by everyone except their inventors. Some of them were single-seaters, others would carry two or even three people; but all were noisy, clumsy, queer-looking things. When in 1888, Carl Benz, a German, produced a three-wheeled, internal-combustion car, a great forward stride had been made. Another German, whose name, Daimler, is often seen on motor cars to this day, was experimenting about the same time, and testing a petrol-driven engine. It is easy to understand how the introduction of the petrol-driven engine revolutionised road transport throughout the world. Until then the necessary power to push a vehicle along could not be obtained without the cumbersome tanks, boilers and furnaces of the steam engine. The internal-combustion engine is light in weight and small in size by comparison; the fuel is burned in it, so that there is no waste, like the dusty cinders of a coal fire.
Q.4
Read the following passage and answer the questions given below it. It was in Gerrnany and France that the first successful attempts were made to produce an internal-combustion engine driven by petrol. In England, people were strangely timid about horseless vehicles. English inventors were handicapped by a quaint old law that forbade any such vehicle to attain a greater speed than four miles an hour, and compelled each one to be preceded by a man carrying a red flag. This law was not repealed until 1896. The earliest motorcars were looked upon as mere jokes, or as rather dangerous playthings, by everyone except their inventors. Some of them were single-seaters, others would carry two or even three people; but all were noisy, clumsy, queer-looking things. When in 1888, Carl Benz, a German, produced a three-wheeled, internal-combustion car, a great forward stride had been made. Another German, whose name, Daimler, is often seen on motor cars to this day, was experimenting about the same time, and testing a petrol-driven engine. It is easy to understand how the introduction of the petrol-driven engine revolutionised road transport throughout the world. Until then the necessary power to push a vehicle along could not be obtained without the cumbersome tanks, boilers and furnaces of the steam engine. The internal-combustion engine is light in weight and small in size by comparison; the fuel is burned in it, so that there is no waste, like the dusty cinders of a coal fire.
What does 'repealed' mean?



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Q.5
Read the following passage and answer the questions given below it. It was in Gerrnany and France that the first successful attempts were made to produce an internal-combustion engine driven by petrol. In England, people were strangely timid about horseless vehicles. English inventors were handicapped by a quaint old law that forbade any such vehicle to attain a greater speed than four miles an hour, and compelled each one to be preceded by a man carrying a red flag. This law was not repealed until 1896. The earliest motorcars were looked upon as mere jokes, or as rather dangerous playthings, by everyone except their inventors. Some of them were single-seaters, others would carry two or even three people; but all were noisy, clumsy, queer-looking things. When in 1888, Carl Benz, a German, produced a three-wheeled, internal-combustion car, a great forward stride had been made. Another German, whose name, Daimler, is often seen on motor cars to this day, was experimenting about the same time, and testing a petrol-driven engine. It is easy to understand how the introduction of the petrol-driven engine revolutionised road transport throughout the world. Until then the necessary power to push a vehicle along could not be obtained without the cumbersome tanks, boilers and furnaces of the steam engine. The internal-combustion engine is light in weight and small in size by comparison; the fuel is burned in it, so that there is no waste, like the dusty cinders of a coal fire.
Which among the following words is as closely opposite to 'clumsy'?



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Q.6
Read the following passage and answer the questions given below it. It was in Gerrnany and France that the first successful attempts were made to produce an internal-combustion engine driven by petrol. In England, people were strangely timid about horseless vehicles. English inventors were handicapped by a quaint old law that forbade any such vehicle to attain a greater speed than four miles an hour, and compelled each one to be preceded by a man carrying a red flag. This law was not repealed until 1896. The earliest motorcars were looked upon as mere jokes, or as rather dangerous playthings, by everyone except their inventors. Some of them were single-seaters, others would carry two or even three people; but all were noisy, clumsy, queer-looking things. When in 1888, Carl Benz, a German, produced a three-wheeled, internal-combustion car, a great forward stride had been made. Another German, whose name, Daimler, is often seen on motor cars to this day, was experimenting about the same time, and testing a petrol-driven engine. It is easy to understand how the introduction of the petrol-driven engine revolutionised road transport throughout the world. Until then the necessary power to push a vehicle along could not be obtained without the cumbersome tanks, boilers and furnaces of the steam engine. The internal-combustion engine is light in weight and small in size by comparison; the fuel is burned in it, so that there is no waste, like the dusty cinders of a coal fire.
What is incorrect about the internal combustion engine?



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Q.7
Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. An important aspect of the growth of modem towns and cities is the increasing population density. Mr J. P. Or, the Honorable Chairman of the Mumbai Improvement Trust, pointed out in a recent lecture on the subject, how it affected the health and prosperity of the inhabitants. Life in most thriving towns is intimately connected with the local trades and industries. Unhealthy conditions in factories and workshops, and offensive trades have been prevented in big towns, and this had led to better health. The question of density is more difficult to deal with in India. because, older towns have been built on different principles. People not only want to live healthly but also live in communities that give them greater social convenience, comfort and safety. They care for the health, comfort and beauty of the town, and these conditions of a well-built and well-arranged town are still insisted on by the people. So as long as individuals obey the laws of health, and their habits and customs are free from insanitary effects, mere density of population does not perhaps tend to increase the death rate and harbour diseases. But in the present day, it is apparent that the habits of people have changed greatly and they do not obey the laws of health and cleanliness as well as their forefathers used to do in days when cities expanded and people flourished. It is, therefore, necessary to modify the old plans of city building in the light of modem sanitary laws and requirements. In his lecture, Mr Or spoke mainly of the density of the city of Mumbai. But his observations are of considerable interest to all those whose population is huddled in narrow quarters, without adequate air and light.
Q.8
Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. An important aspect of the growth of modem towns and cities is the increasing population density. Mr J. P. Or, the Honorable Chairman of the Mumbai Improvement Trust, pointed out in a recent lecture on the subject, how it affected the health and prosperity of the inhabitants. Life in most thriving towns is intimately connected with the local trades and industries. Unhealthy conditions in factories and workshops, and offensive trades have been prevented in big towns, and this had led to better health. The question of density is more difficult to deal with in India. because, older towns have been built on different principles. People not only want to live healthly but also live in communities that give them greater social convenience, comfort and safety. They care for the health, comfort and beauty of the town, and these conditions of a well-built and well-arranged town are still insisted on by the people. So as long as individuals obey the laws of health, and their habits and customs are free from insanitary effects, mere density of population does not perhaps tend to increase the death rate and harbour diseases. But in the present day, it is apparent that the habits of people have changed greatly and they do not obey the laws of health and cleanliness as well as their forefathers used to do in days when cities expanded and people flourished. It is, therefore, necessary to modify the old plans of city building in the light of modem sanitary laws and requirements. In his lecture, Mr Or spoke mainly of the density of the city of Mumbai. But his observations are of considerable interest to all those whose population is huddled in narrow quarters, without adequate air and light.
Q.9
Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. An important aspect of the growth of modem towns and cities is the increasing population density. Mr J. P. Or, the Honorable Chairman of the Mumbai Improvement Trust, pointed out in a recent lecture on the subject, how it affected the health and prosperity of the inhabitants. Life in most thriving towns is intimately connected with the local trades and industries. Unhealthy conditions in factories and workshops, and offensive trades have been prevented in big towns, and this had led to better health. The question of density is more difficult to deal with in India. because, older towns have been built on different principles. People not only want to live healthly but also live in communities that give them greater social convenience, comfort and safety. They care for the health, comfort and beauty of the town, and these conditions of a well-built and well-arranged town are still insisted on by the people. So as long as individuals obey the laws of health, and their habits and customs are free from insanitary effects, mere density of population does not perhaps tend to increase the death rate and harbour diseases. But in the present day, it is apparent that the habits of people have changed greatly and they do not obey the laws of health and cleanliness as well as their forefathers used to do in days when cities expanded and people flourished. It is, therefore, necessary to modify the old plans of city building in the light of modem sanitary laws and requirements. In his lecture, Mr Or spoke mainly of the density of the city of Mumbai. But his observations are of considerable interest to all those whose population is huddled in narrow quarters, without adequate air and light.
Life in most thriving towns is connected with the



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Q.10
Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. An important aspect of the growth of modem towns and cities is the increasing population density. Mr J. P. Or, the Honorable Chairman of the Mumbai Improvement Trust, pointed out in a recent lecture on the subject, how it affected the health and prosperity of the inhabitants. Life in most thriving towns is intimately connected with the local trades and industries. Unhealthy conditions in factories and workshops, and offensive trades have been prevented in big towns, and this had led to better health. The question of density is more difficult to deal with in India. because, older towns have been built on different principles. People not only want to live healthly but also live in communities that give them greater social convenience, comfort and safety. They care for the health, comfort and beauty of the town, and these conditions of a well-built and well-arranged town are still insisted on by the people. So as long as individuals obey the laws of health, and their habits and customs are free from insanitary effects, mere density of population does not perhaps tend to increase the death rate and harbour diseases. But in the present day, it is apparent that the habits of people have changed greatly and they do not obey the laws of health and cleanliness as well as their forefathers used to do in days when cities expanded and people flourished. It is, therefore, necessary to modify the old plans of city building in the light of modem sanitary laws and requirements. In his lecture, Mr Or spoke mainly of the density of the city of Mumbai. But his observations are of considerable interest to all those whose population is huddled in narrow quarters, without adequate air and light.
In addition to health, what do the people want in towns?



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Q.11
Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. An important aspect of the growth of modem towns and cities is the increasing population density. Mr J. P. Or, the Honorable Chairman of the Mumbai Improvement Trust, pointed out in a recent lecture on the subject, how it affected the health and prosperity of the inhabitants. Life in most thriving towns is intimately connected with the local trades and industries. Unhealthy conditions in factories and workshops, and offensive trades have been prevented in big towns, and this had led to better health. The question of density is more difficult to deal with in India. because, older towns have been built on different principles. People not only want to live healthly but also live in communities that give them greater social convenience, comfort and safety. They care for the health, comfort and beauty of the town, and these conditions of a well-built and well-arranged town are still insisted on by the people. So as long as individuals obey the laws of health, and their habits and customs are free from insanitary effects, mere density of population does not perhaps tend to increase the death rate and harbour diseases. But in the present day, it is apparent that the habits of people have changed greatly and they do not obey the laws of health and cleanliness as well as their forefathers used to do in days when cities expanded and people flourished. It is, therefore, necessary to modify the old plans of city building in the light of modem sanitary laws and requirements. In his lecture, Mr Or spoke mainly of the density of the city of Mumbai. But his observations are of considerable interest to all those whose population is huddled in narrow quarters, without adequate air and light.
Q.12
Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. An important aspect of the growth of modem towns and cities is the increasing population density. Mr J. P. Or, the Honorable Chairman of the Mumbai Improvement Trust, pointed out in a recent lecture on the subject, how it affected the health and prosperity of the inhabitants. Life in most thriving towns is intimately connected with the local trades and industries. Unhealthy conditions in factories and workshops, and offensive trades have been prevented in big towns, and this had led to better health. The question of density is more difficult to deal with in India. because, older towns have been built on different principles. People not only want to live healthly but also live in communities that give them greater social convenience, comfort and safety. They care for the health, comfort and beauty of the town, and these conditions of a well-built and well-arranged town are still insisted on by the people. So as long as individuals obey the laws of health, and their habits and customs are free from insanitary effects, mere density of population does not perhaps tend to increase the death rate and harbour diseases. But in the present day, it is apparent that the habits of people have changed greatly and they do not obey the laws of health and cleanliness as well as their forefathers used to do in days when cities expanded and people flourished. It is, therefore, necessary to modify the old plans of city building in the light of modem sanitary laws and requirements. In his lecture, Mr Or spoke mainly of the density of the city of Mumbai. But his observations are of considerable interest to all those whose population is huddled in narrow quarters, without adequate air and light.
What should be kept in mind while modifying the old plans of city buildings?



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Q.13
Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. An important aspect of the growth of modem towns and cities is the increasing population density. Mr J. P. Or, the Honorable Chairman of the Mumbai Improvement Trust, pointed out in a recent lecture on the subject, how it affected the health and prosperity of the inhabitants. Life in most thriving towns is intimately connected with the local trades and industries. Unhealthy conditions in factories and workshops, and offensive trades have been prevented in big towns, and this had led to better health. The question of density is more difficult to deal with in India. because, older towns have been built on different principles. People not only want to live healthly but also live in communities that give them greater social convenience, comfort and safety. They care for the health, comfort and beauty of the town, and these conditions of a well-built and well-arranged town are still insisted on by the people. So as long as individuals obey the laws of health, and their habits and customs are free from insanitary effects, mere density of population does not perhaps tend to increase the death rate and harbour diseases. But in the present day, it is apparent that the habits of people have changed greatly and they do not obey the laws of health and cleanliness as well as their forefathers used to do in days when cities expanded and people flourished. It is, therefore, necessary to modify the old plans of city building in the light of modem sanitary laws and requirements. In his lecture, Mr Or spoke mainly of the density of the city of Mumbai. But his observations are of considerable interest to all those whose population is huddled in narrow quarters, without adequate air and light.
The word 'thriving' used in the above passage means



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Q.14
Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. An important aspect of the growth of modem towns and cities is the increasing population density. Mr J. P. Or, the Honorable Chairman of the Mumbai Improvement Trust, pointed out in a recent lecture on the subject, how it affected the health and prosperity of the inhabitants. Life in most thriving towns is intimately connected with the local trades and industries. Unhealthy conditions in factories and workshops, and offensive trades have been prevented in big towns, and this had led to better health. The question of density is more difficult to deal with in India. because, older towns have been built on different principles. People not only want to live healthly but also live in communities that give them greater social convenience, comfort and safety. They care for the health, comfort and beauty of the town, and these conditions of a well-built and well-arranged town are still insisted on by the people. So as long as individuals obey the laws of health, and their habits and customs are free from insanitary effects, mere density of population does not perhaps tend to increase the death rate and harbour diseases. But in the present day, it is apparent that the habits of people have changed greatly and they do not obey the laws of health and cleanliness as well as their forefathers used to do in days when cities expanded and people flourished. It is, therefore, necessary to modify the old plans of city building in the light of modem sanitary laws and requirements. In his lecture, Mr Or spoke mainly of the density of the city of Mumbai. But his observations are of considerable interest to all those whose population is huddled in narrow quarters, without adequate air and light.
Select from the answer choices a suitable synonym to 'huddle'.



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Q.15
Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. An important aspect of the growth of modem towns and cities is the increasing population density. Mr J. P. Or, the Honorable Chairman of the Mumbai Improvement Trust, pointed out in a recent lecture on the subject, how it affected the health and prosperity of the inhabitants. Life in most thriving towns is intimately connected with the local trades and industries. Unhealthy conditions in factories and workshops, and offensive trades have been prevented in big towns, and this had led to better health. The question of density is more difficult to deal with in India. because, older towns have been built on different principles. People not only want to live healthly but also live in communities that give them greater social convenience, comfort and safety. They care for the health, comfort and beauty of the town, and these conditions of a well-built and well-arranged town are still insisted on by the people. So as long as individuals obey the laws of health, and their habits and customs are free from insanitary effects, mere density of population does not perhaps tend to increase the death rate and harbour diseases. But in the present day, it is apparent that the habits of people have changed greatly and they do not obey the laws of health and cleanliness as well as their forefathers used to do in days when cities expanded and people flourished. It is, therefore, necessary to modify the old plans of city building in the light of modem sanitary laws and requirements. In his lecture, Mr Or spoke mainly of the density of the city of Mumbai. But his observations are of considerable interest to all those whose population is huddled in narrow quarters, without adequate air and light.
Select from the answer choices the word that is as closely opposite in meaning (antonym) to 'harbour'.



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Q.16
Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. An important aspect of the growth of modem towns and cities is the increasing population density. Mr J. P. Or, the Honorable Chairman of the Mumbai Improvement Trust, pointed out in a recent lecture on the subject, how it affected the health and prosperity of the inhabitants. Life in most thriving towns is intimately connected with the local trades and industries. Unhealthy conditions in factories and workshops, and offensive trades have been prevented in big towns, and this had led to better health. The question of density is more difficult to deal with in India. because, older towns have been built on different principles. People not only want to live healthly but also live in communities that give them greater social convenience, comfort and safety. They care for the health, comfort and beauty of the town, and these conditions of a well-built and well-arranged town are still insisted on by the people. So as long as individuals obey the laws of health, and their habits and customs are free from insanitary effects, mere density of population does not perhaps tend to increase the death rate and harbour diseases. But in the present day, it is apparent that the habits of people have changed greatly and they do not obey the laws of health and cleanliness as well as their forefathers used to do in days when cities expanded and people flourished. It is, therefore, necessary to modify the old plans of city building in the light of modem sanitary laws and requirements. In his lecture, Mr Or spoke mainly of the density of the city of Mumbai. But his observations are of considerable interest to all those whose population is huddled in narrow quarters, without adequate air and light.
Q.17
Among the chief sources of education available to Tagore was a quiet garden adjoining his family house. Here he used to spend much of his time, absorbing the peace and beauty of nature. It was through this early contact with nature that he acquired the serenity of mood that distinguished him all his life. It was in this garden that he came to understand the principle of harmony that was at work throughout the Universe. At the same time, he formed the habit of observing and reflecting on things.
How did Tagore spend much of his time in the garden adjoining his family house?



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Q.18
Among the chief sources of education available to Tagore was a quiet garden adjoining his family house. Here he used to spend much of his time, absorbing the peace and beauty of nature. It was through this early contact with nature that he acquired the serenity of mood that distinguished him all his life. It was in this garden that he came to understand the principle of harmony that was at work throughout the Universe. At the same time, he formed the habit of observing and reflecting on things.
How did the garden near Tagore's house serve him?



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Q.19
Among the chief sources of education available to Tagore was a quiet garden adjoining his family house. Here he used to spend much of his time, absorbing the peace and beauty of nature. It was through this early contact with nature that he acquired the serenity of mood that distinguished him all his life. It was in this garden that he came to understand the principle of harmony that was at work throughout the Universe. At the same time, he formed the habit of observing and reflecting on things.
By spending his time in the garden, Tagore developed the habit of



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Q.20
Mikhail Gorbachev's ouster, though dramatic in every respect, is on no account a surprise. Both his foes and his closest friends have been warning of it with a heightened sense of urgency for the past several months. Its consequences, however, are wholly unpredictable. The USSR could well witness protracted violence should the reformists and those republics which have sought varying degrees of sovereignity for themselves choose to defy central authority. It is possible that the country after an initial period of uncertainty, and perhaps even violence, could revert to the pre-perestroika system. Equally uncertain is the course of East-West relations, These are bound to deteriorate though the extent of deterioration must remain a matter of conjecture. Hailed abroad as a leader who had dared to free Soviet citizens from fear, enabled the countries of Eastern Europe to become democracies even as they regained their full sovereign status, paved the way for the reunification of Germany and exposed the moribund and totalitarian character of communism, he, at home appeared to come under fire from all sides.
The removal of Mikhail Gorbachev from power is



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